The News of The Blake School Since 1916

The Spectrum

The News of The Blake School Since 1916

The Spectrum

The News of The Blake School Since 1916

The Spectrum

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The Grammy’s Spark Controversy, Long History of Exclusion

Artists begin boycotting the show as nominations are unfair
Once the nominations for the 2020 Grammys were announced, The Weeknd tweeted, “The Grammys remain corrupt. You owe me, my fans and the industry transparency.”
Bernadette Whitely
Once the nominations for the 2020 Grammys were announced, The Weeknd tweeted, “The Grammys remain corrupt. You owe me, my fans and the industry transparency.”

In the 2014 Grammys, Macklemore won over Kendrick Lamar for Best New Artist. Beyonce’s album, “Lemonade,” Frank Ocean’s “Channel,” Tyler, The Creator album “IGOR,” were all ignored or never won Best Album. BTS, one of the most popular boy bands of all time, was dismissed by the Grammys. The list goes on. 

The Grammys have continuously struggled with awarding artists, sometimes ignoring those who have completely changed the music industry. Specifically, in 2020, The Weeknd has been snubbed for his album “After Hours.” Similarly, young hip-hop producers like Jetsonmade, who produced numerous Dababy hits, and Jack Harlow’s “WHATS POPPIN,” were ignored in this year’s nominations. However, some artists are over recognized. For example, Billie Ellish, winning five awards last year, is nominated for Best Pop Solo Performance and Record of the Year. Although Billie Elish is very talented, both her old and new songs all have similar sounds. 

In addition to the constant misses with the music awards, the industry has had a long history of misconduct, racism, and sexism. Recently, President and Chief Executive of the Recording Academy Deborah Dugan was placed on administrative leave after accusations of misconduct. From four high-ranking women within the Academy, Tammy Hurt, Chrsitine Albert, Leslie Ann ones, and Terry Jones, had written a letter about the sexism in the industry, describing it as a “boys club.” 

In addition to the allocations of the misconduct, during the 2018 Grammys, a journalist asked American Music executive Niel Portnow about the pop singer Alessia Cara. His response was “women who have the creativity in their hearts and souls, who want to be musicians, who want to be engineers, producers, and want to be part of the industry on the executive level simply needed to ‘step up.’” 

Courtesy of Joe Klamar, Getty Images

The Grammy’s has had countless accusations about mistreatment and irrelevance for years. Even major artists like Kanye West, Justin Beiber, Drake, and Frank Ocean have boycotted the award ceremony. Progressive, popular artists are abandoning the Grammys, looking for new platforms, which leaves the award show powerless with scraps of music. If the Grammys don’t change their award system and their leadership, one of the most important popular awards ceremonies might come to an end.

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About the Contributors
Sara Richardson
Sara Richardson, Managing Editor | Front Editor
My name is Sara Richardson. I have been writing for Spectrum for four years, and I have been an editor for three semesters (Opinions, In-Depth, now Front News). I love meeting new people and talking to people about a variety of topics. Additionally, I love to create my page and be creative with Indesign. I swim, play golf, part of the student government, and I love hanging out with friends and trying new restaurants.
Bernadette Whitely
Bernadette Whitely, Editor-in-Chief | Creative Director | In-Depth Editor
Hey, I’m Bernadette and I’m a senior! I'm the Editor-in-Chief and the Creative Director of The Spectrum. I also edit In-Depth pages. In the past, I have edited both Arts and Culture and Opinions sections. Last semester, I was the editor and leader for the Features section. I started Spectrum at the beginning of my freshman year and continued to be a staff writer until the end of my sophomore year. During my time as a staff writer, I wrote articles, created graphics, and took photos. Since starting Spectrum, I have always loved it. Being able to write about topics I am passionate about and interested in was an amazing experience. One of my favorite things about Spectrum is talking to and meeting new people through interviews and collaborations. 

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