ELECTION 2012: Marriage Amendment

ELECTION 2012: Marriage Amendment

Ali Cohen

Sully Whitely, Page Editor

When it comes to the marriage amendment, do you know what your vote really means?  The Spectrum summarizes arguments for and against the marriage amendment and the implications of voting “yes” or “no” before Blake students and faculty head to the polls on Election Day.

Text as it will appear on the ballot:
Limiting the status of marriage to opposite sex couples.
“Recognition of Marriage Solely Between One Man and One Woman.”

VOTING YES:
Would amend the Minnesota Constitution so that only marriages between one man and one woman would be deemed valid by law in the state of Minnesota. Though same sex marriage is currently unrecognized within the state, this amendment seeks to constitutionalize it.

ARGUMENTS FOR: 
The Minnesota Catholic Conference announced its opposition to same sex marriage, arguing that the amendment would “defend marriage as a unique institution that, from the beginning of human history and in every culture, is the union of one man and one woman for the propagation of the human family and the upbringing of children.” Furthermore, Twin Cities Catholic Archbishop John Nienstedt confirms that their support of the amendment is “for reasons that are theological, biological and pastoral.”

VOTING NO:
An amendment against same sex marriage would not be added to the Minnesota Constitution. It would still go unrecognized by law, but if it is not put in the state Constitution, it leaves room for same sex marriage to potentially become legal within the state in the future.

ARGUMENTS AGAINST: 
Those who are against the amendment argue that if the amendment is passed, it would take away basic human rights and go against the country’s foundation on the principle of separation of church and state. Governor Mark Dayton is against the Amendment, stating, “I’m here to support those Minnesotans and Americans who want the same rights, freedoms, opportunity, respect, dignity and legal protections and legal opportunities as every other one of their fellow citizens… which is the founding principal of this country.”

Text of measure from www.ballotpedia.org